I am reblogging this post about the Burlington Lift Bridge which played an important role in my life for several years when I was a young adult. I enjoyed getting reacquainted with it, but I could have sworn the wait for a ship to pass was way longer than 5 minutes. Before the Skyway was built, traffic backed up for miles especially on warm weekends when people were driving to Niagara Falls.

OpallaOnTrails

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The Burlington Canal Lift Bridge is the icon of the Industrial Revolution that took place in Canada in the 19th century. I have therefore chosen it to represent the theme Industrial for this week’s A Word A Week Photo Challenge in response to Skinnywench (aka Sue).

Built in 1826 with the opening of the Burlington Canal, which links the waters of Hamilton Harbour (also known as Burlington Bay) to Lake Erie and Lake Ontario to the Atlantic Ocean, the lift bridge is a tower-driven, moveable and vertically lifted bridge. It raises on demand to big vessels year round and hourly or half-hourly to smaller boats or pleasure vessels in the summer.

According to government statistics, the bridge is 116 metres long, weighs 1996 tonnes and lifts 33.5 metres high as in the photo above. Seen from the picture, the height is similar to the Skyway Bridge (36 metres high) behind it. The…

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2 thoughts on “

  1. So glad to meet you on Blog sphere and thanks for your reblog. Nice to know someone who also shares similar sentiments for the Lift Bridge. You may be right, for a big ship, it could take longer than 5 minutes. This is when I would go back down to walk on the pier out to the lighthouse rather than just stand there and wait. 🙂

    • How delightful to find this post and you. I have been living in Toronto since 1960 and see very little of the Beach Stip as I zoom over the Skyway Bridge.What a treat to find an old friend. Living in the city, one gets used to never meeting familiar people or bridges. Living on WordPress ditto.

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